That’s how fast the CO2 clock is ticking

Look at the CO2 clock

In line with the recent IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) has updated its Carbon Clock.
In 2015, with the Paris Climate Agreement, all nations around the world set themselves the goal of limiting global warming to well below 2°C (preferably 1.5°C) compared to pre-industrial levels. An ambitious goal.

The Special Report of October 2018 presents new figures: The atmosphere can absorb no more than 420 gigatonnes (Gt) of CO2 if we are to stay below the 1.5°C threshold. However, since around 42 Gt of CO2 is emitted globally every year—the equivalent of 1332 tonnes per second—this budget is expected to be used up in just over nine years. The budget for staying below the 2°C threshold, for its part, of approximately 1070 Gt, will be exhausted in about 26 years.

Thus, the clock keeps ticking and shows how little time is left for political decision-makers to  take action. Navigating the MCC website allows for an interactive understanding of the time frame of action required for a given political goal.

With just one click, the upper left-hand corner leads you to the scenario for the 2°C target, and the upper right-hand corner to the 1.5°C target. In both cases, the clock shows the remaining carbon budget—and the remaining time.

While the Carbon Clock appears to be a precise measurement of the time left to ensure climate protection, many uncertainty factors remain, such as different definitions of the 1.5°C target as well as different assumptions about the climate sensitivity, the actually attained degree of global warming, and the future development of other greenhouse gases. Furthermore, the calculation assumes that the annual emissions of years to come will be close to those of the year 2017.

With the best thanks to the MCC Berlin, that we are allowed to publish the CO2 clock.

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How IOTA can help to save carbon emissions

After the Climate Change Conference in Paris has set 2015 global Carbon emissions targets and around 200 countries around the world have come out in favor of it, it’s time to draw a small conclusion. This was published by the IPCC on 8 November with a special report. This article describes the consequences of 1.5 degrees of warming and what needs to be done to keep the temperature from increasing even further.

Over 6,000 studies were evaluated. The result is sobering: currently the world is headed for a global warming of three to four degrees to 2100 — that would have dramatic consequences.

When global warming rises by 4 degrees, plants, animals, and humans can no longer adapt: ​​the entire biological system is overwhelmed. A worldwide extinction of species is the result — especially in wetlands, forests and in the sea. Colossal weather disasters are on the agenda.

Around 3.2 billion people are at risk of increasing water scarcity, about one-fifth of the world’s population at risk of flooding. The sea level rises by about a meter, flat island states will disappear with it.

So that it does not come so far, rapid action of the policy is required, so the conclusion of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. One of the outstanding topics of politics is the transformation of the energy system. In order to avoid emissions, wind and solar energy are an important element here. In order to make sensible use of this renewable energy in a decentralized energy system, the exchange of innumerable data and payment flows is necessary. At this point, IOTA comes into play. IOTA with the Tangle can become an important building block for handling these data and cash flows in a transforming energy system. IOTA has the properties needed for it, but is also ideal for many other applications. In addition to the positive characteristics of Tangles for data communication, the data themselves play a decisive role. You can read our complete article here